Climate Action

Community Climate Action Plan 

Adopted in June, 2021, the CCAP sets a course for reducing community emissions by 80% by 2050 while increasing our resilience to the impacts of climate change.

The CCAP’s eight strategic focus areas—called Big Moves—target community GHG emissions sources primarily from transportation fuels; energy use in buildings; and waste by promoting low-carbon growth, sustainable transportation options, zero-carbon buildings, and a circular economy.

CCAP Modelling Methodology (full version)

View the Community Climate Action Plan


Community Climate Action Plan Youth Art Project 

In spring 2021, as part of the community engagement for the CCAP, Sustainability Services staff presented to grade 9 artists from Westsyde Secondary School, who then interpreted the Big Moves through art and their personal reflections.

View the student art image gallery here


Climate Leadership

Upon becoming a BC Climate Action Charter signatory in 2007, the City pledged to significantly reduce both corporate and community-wide greenhouse gas emissions.

Each year, the City reports its annual inventory of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions generated by municipal operations, as well as actions to reduce emissions, to the Province. To view our most recent report, see the 2019 Climate Action Revenue Incentive (CARIP) Public Report. The CARIP program is wrapping up and did not require a public report for the final 2020 reporting year.

We also strive to reduce emissions through implementing the Sustainable Kamloops Plan (SKP) and the Corporate Energy & Emissions Plan.

View the Sustainable Kamloops Plan 2016 Progress Update Report to review the progress made towards the initiatives and targets within the SKP plan.


 

Frequently Asked Questions
Why is the City of Kamloops taking action on climate change?

In Kamloops, the likelihood of extreme weather events occurring, such as sudden downpours and large scale wildfires, is becoming more common under a changing climate.

Municipalities have influence on 60 percent of Canada’s total greenhouse gas emissions because of their jurisdiction over several important sectors that have large impacts on the climate, including land use, transportation, buildings, and waste management. City-level emissions reductions make significant contributions to addressing climate change.

The City has been a signatory to the BC Climate Action Charter since 2007 and has undertaken efforts to reduce GHG emissions from municipal operations. This plan will identify opportunities and actions to address community emissions.

In addition, the Province recently released its CleanBC Plan which includes actions to use energy more efficiently and prevent waste, with a target of 40% emission reductions below 2007 levels by 2030, and 80% by 2050. The Community Climate Action Plan will help the City to prepare for and support the Province’s climate action goals.

What is the City doing?

Upon becoming a BC Climate Action Charter signatory in 2007, the City pledged to significantly reduce both corporate and community-wide greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Each year, the City reports its annual inventory of GHG emissions generated by municipal operations, as well as actions to reduce emissions, to the Province. To view our most recent report, see the 2018 Climate Action Revenue Incentive (CARIP) Public Report.

We also strive to reduce emissions through implementing the Sustainable Kamloops Plan and the Corporate Energy & Emissions Plan. The recently updated Official Community Plan, and Transportation Master Plan both broadly support community GHG emissions reductions.

What are the benefits of reducing greenhouse gas emissions in our community?

Taking action on climate change at the community level can have many positive health, social and economic benefits, including:

Improved community health:

  • better air quality from decreased congestion and energy use
  • healthier lifestyles from facilitating active transportation choices
  • improved social cohesion from smart land use and transportation infrastructure

Local economic development:

  • job creation in green building, retrofits and energy assessments
  • increased demand for energy efficient and renewable energy technologies
  • energy savings or income generated re-spent in the local economy

Lower household expenses:

  • energy efficient buildings and houses cost less to heat and cool
  • reduced long term costs for owners or tenants as a result of energy efficiency retrofits and energy efficiency requirements for new builds
  • reduced costs associated with vehicle ownership and use, from facilitating sustainable transportation options such as carpooling, car sharing, transit, cycling, and walking
Where do our emissions come from?